Tag Archives: children’s books

SUBMISSION ANNOUNCEMENT

2 Oct

This is just a quick note to announce the first submission deadline for A Cuppa and An Armchair.

****Monday 10th October 2011 11.59PM.****

All submissions should be sent to chat@elenaransley.com

Entries cannot be longer than 2,000 words, there is not a minimum word count.

We require stories for both children and adults but they cannot contain offensive language or graphic images.

This is an open genre project.

If you have further questions please ask.

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Do you write about where you live?

24 Aug

Llandegla is based in North Wales, not too far from where I live. It isn’t somewhere I visit, I just pass through from time to time. At the weekend we jumped in the car to head to the local supermarket, but decided we would take a de tour. Not having a destination in mind, we asked our son at each junction whether we should turn left or right. We passed through Coedpoeth and headed further up the mountain into Bwlchgwyn, reputed to be the highest village in North Wales.

Continuing on, we passed the boarders through three counties, the open countryside and views an inspiration to our eyes. Of all the areas we passed through, Llandegla, and its immediate surrounding areas is the part that stays in my mind the most from that journey. Having lived here for five years, I thought I had seen pretty much all the area had to offer, well, at least glimpsed it. That trip treated me to the views of the sprawling fields, filled with purple heather in full bloom. I confess, as it was a spur of the moment trip I didn’t even have my phone so was unable to take photos for you. You will just have to trust me, it was beautiful. (Just a shame the sun wasn’t shining, but it is Wales…).

The imagery reminded me of books I read as a child, The Sadler’s Wells Collection by Lorna Hill. As the name suggests, they are primarily based in London, and focus on the The Sadler’s Wells Theatre. For those that do not know it, it is based in Covent Garden and is famous for its ballet. As with all good children’s books, the focus was not just on the ballet, but spoke of the connections of where the protagonist lived during the holidays, in Northumberland. Needless to say, horse riding, moorlands and everything remote became a large factor when at ‘home’. Hill describes how even when dancing, the landscape of home would influence the dancers moves, and naturally make everything that much more beautiful, and romantic.

As a child, growing up in Kent, I loved my surroundings but never felt inspired by them. Indeed, it was only once I moved to Wales I started writing. Where are all my works based? In Kent of course. Once you remove from an area, you are able to see it in a different light, suddenly the old ramshackle cottage with brambles growing over its path has a new meaning. It is not an eyesore, just a secret waiting to be told.

I do cherish my surroundings here in Wales. Just at the end of my road, I am able to glance down and see the town spreading before my eyes. Yep, I live on top of a mountain and I can tell you, as wonderful as the views are, it is freezing, and for certain it is not somewhere you want to be throughout the cold winter months. The architecture of the town beats many idolised towns and cities. In fact, although I do love Chester, the neighbouring city with a wealth of history, it does seem somewhat dull and cliché. Wrexham, just has something different, but I don’t see it anymore. I can only speak of its effect on me based on my memory of when I first moved here. Now I see all the worst parts of the area, the bits that eventually drag you down. If it was my home town, it wouldn’t. You accept it, but away from home, you are always comparing.

By the looks of it, and we have talked about this for some time, we shall soon be moving back to Kent. Our original plan had only ever been to stay for three years, I guess you could say, life got in the way. Now, I do believe Wrexham is getting in the way. This decision, has met a mixed reaction. Mostly, ‘dont move’ by our local friends, and ‘yay, your coming home’ from those closest to us in Kent. It is nice to hear these words, but the world is a small place, and the UK is pretty much miniscule. Travel is not hard these days. From our location in Kent to Wrexham, it is about a five-hour drive, and that’s allowing for stops. On the train it is about three hours and they just whizz by. For those of you who love in America, I know, it’s practically around the corner, why does anyone care???

As close as it is, it doesn’t distract from  the two areas being very different. Not just the scenery, but also the people, the weather…

When we do move there is one thing that I know will be a certainty, my writing will be stronger than before, my settings more varied. I will also be able to open up my writing to  more literary tendencies. I am intrigued as to whether my chosen genre will change. I know in the past prolonged visits to Kent have influenced my choice of writing YA.

So what about you? Do you write about your immediate surroundings? Have you taken time to explore nearby? Do different factors affect your genre? Would you be willing to move to create new opportunities?

Enhanced e-books

19 Feb

Enhanced e-books fascinate me. Namely because I haven’t yet figured out if we really need them.

OK, no I’m not sure that is what I mean. Let me start at the beginning.

Enhanced e-books can take many forms, from the inclusion of video, such as Russell Brands Booky Wook, to the interactive illustration of Alice.

Let’s consider these two examples, quite honestly, Russell Brand looking away from the camera, reading the text in front of me doesn’t really do much for me…it certainly doesn’t justify the price increase from the standard version. Yes there are videos of his old stand up but, who cares, I can get it all on you tube.

But then there is Alice, and example of what you can do is below (taken from you tube ha!)

Amazing right?

But did you know this is not technically an e-book? It is an app, just like so many others.

There are changes coming so this sort of compatibility will be within the e-books, but do we really need them?

From what I have seen, most of these types at this time, are children’s books. I am all for encouraging kids to read, but are you going to give your iPad to your child to read? At the prices they currently market at, I certainly won’t, and besides, there are plenty of other platforms to enhance children’s reads. Leapfrog, and Vtech are market leaders.

So tell me what you think. Have I got this all wrong, are enhanced books needed, what do you want to see?

Children’s books – Introducing Sir Charlie Stinky Socks

14 Jan

I haven’t before mentioned children’s books on this blog, which is wrong, really wrong.  Today I would like to introduce you to a series of children’s books that I think are so very right.

Sir Charlie Stinky Socks is written and illustrated by Kristina Stephenson The first book in the series is ‘Sir Charlie Stinky Socks and the really dreadful spell’.

‘Sir Charlie Stinky Socks, his good grey mare and his pet cat Envelope decide the time has come for a really big adventure. Sir Charlie packs his best sword and his sandwiches and off he goes, over the hills and far away, until he gets to the deep, dark forest. Sir Charlie doesn’t flinch when he meets the beasties, or the dragon, or the wily witch, but when he comes across the princess, he realises he’s met his match’.

Following on from this first adventure, Sir Charlie experiences a ‘Really frightful night,’  and a ‘ Really dreadful spell.

 

Not only are the stories fantastic with wiggly woos and a witch with a watch, the illustrations really tell the story, drawing you in. Plus, you can interact with large flaps and pull out pages. Forget the kids, you will love reading this as much as they will hearing it.

I for one hope we will see more of this brave bold knight. What a refreshing change for the children’s bookshelf.

Egmont Books Ltd