Tag Archives: reviews

The Sphinx Project – Review

6 Mar

Today I want to share with you The Sphinx Project a new title that has just been released by self published author Katherine Hawkings.

Lets start with the blurb:

Not many people can say their entire existence has been one big lab experiment: poked and prodded by scientists, genetically modified to be the best and endure the worst, subjected to daily tests and trials that would kill a normal human. All Michaela wants is her own life, to be able to go to school, flirt with boys, maybe eat ice cream now and then. So when the chance to escape finally comes, Michaela and her sister grab it, taking their friends with them.
But they weren’t the only ones to find their way out of those labs. Following close behind are another breed of creature, one that doesn’t know the difference between right and wrong, who exist only to feed their own hunger. The appearance of a strange boy who seems too much like them to be a coincidence makes things even more confusing. But as the world begins to literally fall apart around them, Michaela must accept his help, especially when she could lose the very thing she holds dearest: her sister.

Sounds good. Believe me, it does not disappoint. Fast paced, action packed, compelling storyline..even the slightest hint of romance is included in this genreless book.(Maybe I have made that word up – lets run with it!) And it is genreless, its crossover is what holds its appeal, a bit of everything for everyone and it certainly seems effortless, and there is not one point that I scrunched my face feeling that it didn’t work.

Sure, it may predominantly fit YA but i think to pigeon-hole it would detract from its quality.

I just have two negative points to raise. During the first half of the book a couple of times I felt the information was repeated. Just the odd line, but I noticed it, so I have to mention it. The other one is the fact that this book is part of a series, and I need the rest of that series NOW. Seriously, I feel like my iPad has been stolen midway through a book.

My recommendation is that everyone should read this book. Even if it isn’t your usual cup of tea, the drama and action is too much to ignore, you will be at the end before you even know you have started. If, like me, you are impatient, I recommend you follow Katherine Hawkings to keep up to date with new releases so you can get the full series in one hit as soon as it is available.

You can pick up your copy here.

A Cuppa Book Launch is happening now!

8 Dec

The book launch is on now http://www.facebook.com/ACuppaandAnArmchair/posts/207771662637092#!/events/256764657711969/

Come and show your support – tell us what biscuits you like to dunk in your cuppa!

Mary Higgins Clark – Let me Call You Sweetheart

21 Oct

I have read Higgins Clarks work for as long as I can remember. I was hooked from the first book, and have quite often sat down to indulge in some afternoon TV for the adaptations.

Each book has the same set up. Each ends the same way, very predictable. However, I am yet to guess the outcome on any book. Oh, and the titles I think are so similar that I almost didn’t read this one thinking I had read it some time before. I guess that’s why this blog features a reading list. Once you have it written down what you have read, you never forget.

 

Anyway, back to this book. Kerry McGrath is a prosecutor. After her daughter is injured in a traffic accident, she visits a plastic surgeon. Whilst waiting to be seen, Kerry spots a familiar looking woman exiting the surgery. When she enquires about who this lady is, the name rings no bells. Fast forward several weeks and Kerry is sat in the waiting room again. the same face appears, but is definitely not the same woman.

As Kerry digs for info, she starts releasing demons from a past trial, putting not only her own life, but her daughters too, in danger. Throughout the twists and turns you think you have it figured, just be surprised by the turn of a page.

Well done Higgins Clark, you’ve done it again.

Susan Lewis – The Mill House

14 Oct

This book as with all others was passed on to me. It still has the sticker on it telling me it was purchased from a Supermarket for a £1.

I could weep for Susan Lewis.

This book is by far one of the best I have read in a long time. It has beautiful imagery, and a compelling storyline. So I figured out the ending long before it happened, but sometimes that just doesnt matter.

The story is about Julia Thayne, a wannabe writer, with a successful past in the publishing industry. Her husband Josh is a successful agent, and to die for. But Julie has a secret in her past that threatens to destroy everything she has. when she receives some shocking news, Julie heads down to Cornwall to find the truth.

This story is about Julie, her husband, her children, her family, and everyone who has ever been close to her. It shows the fragility of friendship, the awful extents some families will go to, not to protect, just to hide.

I believed every word Lewis said, I never once doubted the actions of the characters. I wanted to hug Julia. I wanted to help reveal the past.

Read this. I have no more to say.

Rachel Hore – The Dream House

7 Oct

This book had me hooked from the start. Although I thoroughly enjoyed the text, I will say it was more a personal connection that had me hooked.

Kate Hutchinson and her hubby decide to up sticks and move from London to her hubby’s home village in Norfolk. In a big romantic whir of what life would be for them, they get caught up in the oh so not important details. It is only when Kate’s hubby, who has continued to work in London starts to stay away, that the reality of the situation hits them.

Out walking the dog one evening, Kate stumbles across a house. she feels s strong connection to it. peering through the window she finds the elderly owner in need.

I will stop there. I know I will give away the ending if I continue.

The reason I say my enjoyment may well be to do with a personal connection, is because this story had one major flaw. Dreams, mystical links, coincidence – Kate had found a necklace and it turns out it is the elderly owners who just happens to be distantly related to Kate…

If you are stuck for something to read, or want something light for a holiday, then dive straight in. If you are an old romantic, then yeah, you should pick this up. If you pull a writers work to pieces, don’t bother. You will be pulling your hair out by the end.

 

Kate has no friends, no one to rely on. Yet, her surroundings are wonderful, and the kids love it.

Ian Rankin – Hide & Seek

30 Sep

Before I start, I just want to say I absolutely love Ian Rankin, so this is totally biased.

Rebus by far is my favourite Detective. He has so many foibles, can at times come across as a bumbling idiot, yet he is brilliant. The more I read, the more in awe of Rankin’s writing I become. I just wish I had read the books in order.

Each book has its main story, each book stands alone. Yet, just like with many of the great detective novels, there is an ongoing story about the detective himself.

This novel starts with ethe discovery of a body in an Edinburgh squat, to many it would seem an open and shut suicide case, but not Rebus. Digging deep into the murky undertones of the city, Rebus discovers a much more sinister and sleazy layer than even he could ever imagine.

As I have already said, I love Rankin’s writing so for me to say I couldn’t put the book down probably doesn’t surprise you. All I will say, don’t make the same mistake as me. If you havent read any of the Rebus series, start at the begiining. You wont regret it.

Erica James – Airs & Graces

2 Sep

We all know I read anything, and we all know my reading lists aren’t recommendations, merely comments on what I have read. So, what can I say about Airs & Graces?

It was a really easy relaxing read. Perfect for the beach I guess, albeit a little tame. Sure you could read it through in one go, but I sure wasn’t bothered when I did put it down. Pleasant, that’s my choice description.

I’m just nodding my head. I have nothing else to say.